Archive for the ‘British current affairs’ Category


How do people decide how to vote in an election?

November 15th, 2019 by Roger Darlington

The calling of a snap General Election in the UK was hardly a surprise: Boris Johnson was planning one from the day he became Prime Minister and, after failing to get his Brexit deal through Parliament, he decided to seek the majority he needs to get his deal “over the line”. The result may not […]

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Brexit bingo – on the day of the Commons vote and the people’s march

October 19th, 2019 by Roger Darlington

A drink is not compulsory each time you hear these, but it might not be a bad idea: “Customs border in the Irish Sea” “Get Brexit done” “The will of the people” “17.4 million people” “No more dither and delay” “A reckless Tory Brexit” “No-deal cliff edge” “Chlorinated chicken” “No one voted to be poorer” […]

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Discussion at the Labour Party Annual Conference in Brighton this week

September 23rd, 2019 by Roger Darlington

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How does the UK Supreme Court operate and what is it going to decide on prorogation?

September 18th, 2019 by Roger Darlington

The Supreme Court is a relatively new institution in the British constitutional system and few people know much about it. In my short guide to the British political system, I have provided a brief explanation of the Supreme Court here. The court really has two decisions to make. First, is the issue of prorogation “justiciable”? […]

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Can the positions of the political parties on Brexit get any weirder?

September 18th, 2019 by Roger Darlington

For three years, Brexit has been a moving picture with surprise after surprise. It’s a political soap opera that never ceases to amaze. So now we have three established political parties facing in very different directions but each with major doubts over their capacity to deliver their current position. The official Conservative view is that […]

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When a general election is actually held, could Labour win it?

September 9th, 2019 by Roger Darlington

Most recent polls do not look good for Labour with Conservative leads of between 10% (Opinium) – 14% (YouGov). But there are many variables to consider and a major one is timing. ComRes has done a survey looking at voting intention before and after 31 October on the assumption that, before that date, there is […]

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Oh, I do like to be beside the seaside …

September 5th, 2019 by Roger Darlington

… and today I’m off for a day trip to Brighton before summer is completely over. Of course, here in Britain, you’re never too far from the sea. But how far from the idea is the furthest location and where is that? The answers are 70 miles and the delightfully named Coton in the Elms […]

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If a week is a long time in politics, this week could be one of the most extraordinary you’ll ever know

September 2nd, 2019 by Roger Darlington

Former Prime Minister Harold Wilson once noted that a week is a long time in politics. But even he never experienced the kind of week that lies ahead of us in the British parliamentary scene. It is going to be constitutionally fascinating and politically turbulent and historically seismic. As the “Guardian” summary puts it: Monday: […]

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How Netanyahu could lose; how Boris could be beaten; and why voting matters

August 19th, 2019 by Roger Darlington

There’s an election going on in Israel right now and incumbent Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu is widely expected to retain power, but my friend Eric Lee has written an interesting column for the “Times of Israel” explaining how Netanyahu could lose. The argument rests on the supposition that Israeli Arabs – who comprise a fifth […]

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What would really be involved in a no-deal Brexit and why we should be really worried

July 30th, 2019 by Roger Darlington

In the last few days, a whole bunch of new Cabinet ministers will have been briefed by civil servants on the consequences of a no-deal Brexit and the planning that will be required to mitigate these consequences. These Ministers will now know what a cabal of ex Cabinet Ministers have known for a long time […]

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